Satellite Technology News

powered by google

Satellite Spotlight:  

Satellite Technology RSS Feed
Share

TMCNet:  Vishay Intertechnology Releases Fully Integrated Proximity Sensor Combining IR Emitter, Photo-Pin-Diode, Signal Processing IC, and 16-Bit ADC in Compact 4.85 mm x 2.35 mm x 0.83 mm Package

[December 03, 2012]

Vishay Intertechnology Releases Fully Integrated Proximity Sensor Combining IR Emitter, Photo-Pin-Diode, Signal Processing IC, and 16-Bit ADC in Compact 4.85 mm x 2.35 mm x 0.83 mm Package

(Marketwire Via Acquire Media NewsEdge) MALVERN, PA -- (Marketwire) -- 12/03/12 -- Vishay Intertechnology, Inc. (NYSE: VSH) today added to its optoelectronics portfolio by introducing a fully integrated proximity sensor that combines an IR emitter, photo-pin-diode, signal processing IC, and 16-bit ADC in one small 4.85 mm x 2.35 mm x 0.83 mm surface-mount package. The space-saving VCNL3020 supports an easy-to-use I²C bus communication interface, and it features an interrupt function and an integrated external emitter driver to extend the sensor's range.

The VCNL3020's 16-bit effective resolution for proximity detection ensures excellent cross talk immunity, eliminating the need for a mechanical barrier between the emitter and detector. While other products only achieve object detection up to 100 mm, the sensor's programmable LED drive current from 10 mA to 200 mA (in 10 mA steps) allows distances up to 200 mm, and to more than a meter when the integrated emitter driver is used to drive external emitters. The VCNL3020 offers excellent ambient light immunity by modulating the emitter signal.

The device's interrupt function enables the sensor to work independently until a programmable threshold value occurs, and then it wakes up the microcontroller. This helps customers reduce their software effort and lower power consumption by eliminating polling communication traffic between the sensor and microcontroller.

For mobile devices such as smartphones, touch phones, PDAs, GPS units, and digital cameras, the VCNL3020 saves power as a proximity sensor for touch screen locking. The device serves as an optical switch for computing and industrial devices and displays.

Featuring low standby current consumption of 1.5 microamps, the device offers a supply voltage range of 2.5 V to 3.6 V and I²C bus voltage range from 1.7 V to 5 V. Customers can estimate the current consumption of the sensor in their application at http://www.vishay.com//optoelectronics/opto-sensors-calculator/. The sensor operates over a temperature range of - 25 degrees C to + 85 degrees C. The VCNL3020 is RoHS-compliant.

Samples of the new sensor are available now. Production quantities will be available in March 2013, with a lead time of eight weeks for large orders. Follow optical sensors from Vishay at http://twitter.com/vishayindust.

Vishay Intertechnology, Inc., a Fortune 1,000 Company listed on the NYSE (VSH), is one of the world's largest manufacturers of discrete semiconductors (diodes, MOSFETs, and infrared optoelectronics) and passive electronic components (resistors, inductors, and capacitors). These components are used in virtually all types of electronic devices and equipment, in the industrial, computing, automotive, consumer, telecommunications, military, aerospace, power supplies, and medical markets. Vishay's product innovations, successful acquisition strategy, and "one-stop shop" service have made it a global industry leader. Vishay can be found on the Internet at www.vishay.com.

Link to datasheet:http://www.vishay.com/doc 84150 (VCNL3020) Link to product photo:http://www.flickr.com/photos/vishay/8224182917 Source: Vishay Intertechnology, Inc.

[ Satellite Spotlight's Homepage ]


blog comments powered by Disqus

FREE Satellite eNewsletter

Subscribe to our free weekly Satellite Spotlight eNewsletter!

Get the latest expert news, reviews & resources. Tailored specifically for Satellite Technology and Communications.

Satellite Technology White Papers

Innovative Features Mean Major Savings for Cellular Operators Using Satellite Backhaul
With the rising cost of satellite bandwidth and the need for more of it to support an ever increasing number of voice, data and now video services, operators must seek ways to reduce both their hardware investment costs and operating expenses, especially when fierce competition forces them to provide these new services without raising their rates.

Satellite Technology Features