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TMCNet:  ViaSat gets $52 million Satcom contract for Airborne ISR

[December 21, 2012]

ViaSat gets $52 million Satcom contract for Airborne ISR

Dec 21, 2012 (TELECOMWORLDWIRE via COMTEX) -- ViaSat Inc. (NASDAQ: VSAT) will provide broadband airborne satcom services for a US government customer under a contract award valued at $52 million.

The one year contract is a renewal for services already provided using ViaSat ArcLight technology over a managed private network established in 2009 to support military missions for the War on Terror.

ViaSat mobile broadband systems are designed to provide high-speed, beyond line-of-sight communications for media-rich ISR, C2, and other applications. Typical operational data rates range from 1 to 8 Mbps off the aircraft using Ku- and Ka-band satcom links. These systems are flown on over 300 government aircraft such as the C-130, C-17, U-28, and various King Air models, accumulating over 500,000 mission hours.

These same terminals can operate seamlessly on the global Yonder satellite network. In addition, ViaSat offers higher priority regional service overlays to Yonder network coverage with a range of connectivity and performance options.

ViaSat delivers fast, secure communications, Internet, and network access to virtually any location for consumers, governments, enterprise, and the military.

Comments on this story may be sent to tww.feedback@m2.com

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