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January 15, 2013

Global Navigation Satellite Market Charts a Course to Its Future

By Steve Anderson, Contributing TMCnet Writer


While most of us are familiar with the concept of GPS, for good or ill, many of us have found the service an extremely welcome and reliable part of our everyday lives. In that vein, the military has more recently had access to a service known as Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) which has quite a bit more to it. But, as formerly military or government applications have been known to do from time to time, GNSS is looking to go wide, and this may well spell changes for the way normal people do things, as explained in a recent report from Frost & Sullivan (News - Alert).

Frost & Sullivan's Market Insight, entitled "Global Navigation Satellite System Market Assessment - In Pursuit of New Business Opportunities," took a closer look at the impact that GNSS is likely to have across several different market sectors. More specifically, Frost & Sullivan's analysis suggests improved prominence in several different markets in the near future, especially the Position, Navigation and Timing (PNT) data that comes from GNSS operations, as well as the associated Value Added Services (VAS) accompanying the operations of GNSS over the course of the next 10 to 20 years. Frost & Sullivan also expected the addition of GNSS to several other applications referred to as non-safety of life (Non-SOL) applications like Road Services and Location-based Services.

Frost & Sullivan expects a doubling in the Asia-Pacific (APAC) market and then some over the course of just the next 10 years as far as GNSS goes, with the market set to climb from 22.10 billion euros in 2012 to a whopping 56.07 billion euros by 2021. It's going to represent one of the fastest growth rates worldwide at 10.9 percent. But they won't be alone in major growth; Frost & Sullivan also expects the market to approach double in the beleaguered European market, with growth going from 16.90 billion euros in 2012 to a hefty 28.54 billion euros in 2021.

While GNSS has a lot of potential, especially when it starts interfacing with the already in-place GPS concept, there is still something of an issue in terms of getting GNSS running at its full capacity and offering the widest array of possible services. Specifically, it's one of infrastructure. That's in the process of changing, though, as even Frost & Sullivan expects the full array of non-military applications of GNSS to not be available until 2020. But more highly-regulated SOL applications, as well as Publicly Regulated Services (PRS) and Search-And-Rescue (SAR) applications will likely be in play by the end of 2015. Getting the necessary number of satellites in the appropriate positions to have an impact is also vital to the fullest launch of GNSS.

Finally, Frost & Sullivan has recommendations for those looking to enter the field. Specifically, they call for a focus on specific applications that have mature technology for the short term like aviation applications, but to also keep an eye on the future applications so as to be ahead of the curve and ready on day one.

Frost & Sullivan's recommendations on this front look sound, and certainly fall in the boundaries of common sense. Build what can be put into use today, but at the same time, start developing what will be put into use tomorrow today as well so that it will be ready to go at launch. The full report from Frost & Sullivan contains still more information about the topic, but what they've already announced is a good start for most firms looking to enter the field.

Want to learn more about the latest in communications and technology? Then be sure to attend ITEXPO Miami 2013, Jan 29- Feb. 1 in Miami, Florida.  Stay in touch with everything happening at ITEXPO (News - Alert). Follow us on Twitter.




Edited by Brooke Neuman



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